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Be mindful of your stress levels, stamina and medical history when gymming in your 40s & 50s: Doctors

Be mindful of your stress levels, stamina and medical history when gymming in your 40s & 50s: Doctors


The sudden death of TV actor Siddhaanth Vir Surryavanshi, 46, from a heart attack has shocked the industry and fans alike. The Kyun Rishton Mein Katti Batti actor reportedly collapsed while working out at a gym, and was rushed to a hospital in Mumbai, where he was declared dead. In a similar incident, in September, stand-up comedian Raju Srivastava, 58, died at AIIMS in New Delhi after reportedly suffering a cardiac arrest while on the treadmill at a gym. The sudden death of Puneeth Rajkumar, 46, last year left colleagues and fans equally dumbfounded. The actor too died from a cardiac arrest after reportedly complaining about chest pain following a workout session.
The Kyun Rishton Mein Katti Batti actor reportedly collapsed while working out at a gym, and was rushed to a hospital in Mumbai, where he was declared dead.

Doctors say that regular gymming cannot be the only marker of good health, and add that preventive health check-ups should not be taken lightly as one hits their 40s and 50s. In addition to this, they caution, “Don’t ignore symptoms like chest heaviness, light-headedness, and pain in the jaw. ”

‘GET PREVENTIVE HEALTH CHECK-UPS BEFORE YOU HIT A GYM AND AVOID OVEREXERTION’
Preventive health check-ups are a must before one starts gymming, say doctors. Dr Simmi Manocha, Director, Cardiology, Accord Superspeciality Hospital, Faridabad, explains, “Fit patients collapsing in the gym is further reaffirming the need for regular preventive health check-ups. Before joining a gym or taking on rigorous exercises, one must seek guidance from a doctor and undergo stress tests to gauge their stamina and endurance, and how much their body can tolerate.”

In September, stand-up comedian Raju Srivastava, 58, died at AIIMS in New Delhi after reportedly suffering a cardiac arrest while on the treadmill at a gym. Puneeth Rajkumar, 46, too died from a cardiac arrest after reportedly complaining about chest pain following a workout session

Dr Amit Bhushan Sharma, Director & Unit Head, Cardiology, Paras Hospitals, Gurgaon, adds, “Whenever you are exercising, your competition is not with the gym trainer or with a Bollywood celebrity, your competition is with yourself. So, take it easy in the gym. Do not overexert. Do not overwork. Ensure that the workout area is properly air conditioned so that you’re not deprived of oxygen. Maintain good hydration. Avoid alcohol after a workout. All these small measures go a long way in preventing a sudden cardiac arrest.”

‘DO NOT EXCEED 70% OF YOUR MAXIMUM HEART RATE ON TREADMILL’
Dr Manish Hinduja, Consultant-Cardio Thoracic & Vascular Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mulund, explains, “Sudden or extreme exertion during workouts is known to trigger a heart attack. It is common in patients with underlying cardiac disease, which may manifest at the time of exertion. People working out in the gym sometimes overdo the exercises beyond their threshold. Many such patients usually have underlying, undiagnosed heart disease. It can also be linked to stress levels, smoking, unhealthy food habits, and diagnosed diabetic status. Generally speaking, moderate exercise is good for the heart. But if there are undiagnosed coronary artery blockages, rhythm problems, outflow tract obstructions, or valve issues, these can be linked with increased cardiac events in a young population. While working out in the gym, please don’t ignore symptoms like chest heaviness, light-headedness, and pain in the jaw, back, or shoulders on exertion. Monitor your heart rate on the treadmill. It should not exceed 70 per cent of your maximum heart rate (220 – age, per minute). Usually, keeping the heart rate less than 140/min is advisable.”

Points to keep in mind


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